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compilingwrfchemchinook

Installing WRF-Chem on UAF Geophysical Institute's Chinook Cluster

Introduction

Installing WRF-Chem on Chinook is similar to building it on Pacman, except that I find it runs faster when compiled with the Intel compiler suite. I'm not sure why this is. I'll include instructions for compiling with PGI and Intel, below.

The step by step instructions below assume that you have already created a directory for this WRF-Chem copy, and already downloaded the WRF and WRF-Chem tar.gz files.

The entire compiling process takes about 30-45 minutes if you are compiling on the Chinook login node.

Step by step installation for WRF-Chem **Using PGI Compilers**

  1. Set the following environmental variables (Consider entering them into your $HOME/.bashrc or .profile)
    • export WRFIO_NCD_LARGE_FILE_SUPPORT=1
    • export WRF_EM_CORE=1
    • export WRF_NMM_CORE=0
    • export WRF_CHEM=1
    • export WRF_KPP=0
  2. You will need to run the following module commands (for Pacman only):
    • module purge
    • module load PrgEnv-pgi/13.4
    • module load hdf5/1.8.9.pgi-13.4
    • module load netcdf/4.3.0.pgi-13.4
    • module load gcc/4.7.3
  3. Extract the WRF-Volc tar.gz file.
  4. Enter the new directory.
  5. If not using our WRF-Volc code, extract the Chem tar.gz file into this new WRF directory. Skip this if you are using the modified WRF-Volc code, since it already contains the chemistry files.
  6. Run ./configure
  7. Select Linux x86_64, PGI compiler with gcc (dmpar)
  8. Select your nesting options (usually 1)
  9. Run vi configure.wrf
  10. Make sure that the configure.wrf file has the following settings
    • DM_FC = mpif90
    • DM_CC = mpicc -DMPI2_SUPPORT
  11. Save the file and exit
  12. Compile the program with ./compile em_real > compile.log 2>&1 &
  13. You can follow the compiling process by executing tail -f compile.log
  14. After the compilation of em_real is finished, you still need to compile the emissions driver.
  15. ./compile emi_conv >& compile.emiss.log

Check the log files (compile.log and compile.emiss.log) by searching for the “Error” string. This string will not appear if the compile script finished without errors.

Step by step installation for WRF-Chem **Using Intel Compilers**

  1. Set the following environmental variables (Consider entering them into your $HOME/.bashrc or .profile)
    • export WRFIO_NCD_LARGE_FILE_SUPPORT=1
    • export WRF_EM_CORE=1
    • export WRF_NMM_CORE=0
    • export WRF_CHEM=1
    • export WRF_KPP=0
  2. You will need to run the following module commands (for Pacman only):
    • module purge
    • module load PrgEnv-intel/2016
    • module load hdf5/1.8.11.intel-2016
    • module load netcdf/4.3.0.intel-2016
  3. Extract the WRF-Volc tar.gz file.
  4. Enter the new directory.
  5. If not using our WRF-Volc code, extract the Chem tar.gz file into this new WRF directory. Skip this if you are using the modified WRF-Volc code, since it already contains the chemistry files.
  6. Run ./configure
  7. Select Linux x86_64 i486 i586 i686, ifort compiler with icc (dmpar)
  8. Select your nesting options (usually 1)
  9. Do not modify the configure.wrf file as you would do with PGI
  10. Save the file and exit
  11. Compile the program with ./compile em_real > compile.log 2>&1 &
  12. You can follow the compiling process by executing tail -f compile.log
  13. After the compilation of em_real is finished, you still need to compile the emissions driver.
  14. ./compile emi_conv >& compile.emiss.log

Intel error messages aren't as conveniently found as those in PGI builds. Again, the best way to see if the program compiled correctly is to edit the compile.log file and search for “warning” or “error” or “Error”. “warning” and “error” may appear as parts of file names or for innocuous warnings that can be ignored, but “Error” should not appear.

compilingwrfchemchinook.txt · Last modified: 2016/02/18 14:22 by sean